Find Us

14a Hanbury Street
London
E1 6QR
United Kingdom

+44 (0) 7771 908 327

10 essential tips (for filming a TEDx event)


Want to film a TEDx or any other talk? Here are our 10 essential filming tips:

1. TALENT

Make sure your talent has rehearsed! There’s nothing less engaging than an unconfident speaker. A well delivered speech will save you hours in post production and engage the viewers, maximising its reach and credibility. If your speaker has rehearsed their speech comprehensively, a few run throughs should be enough to bring the speaker, the AV support and camera crew up to speed before the actual shoot.

Make sure you allow time for a tech and camera rehearsal at the location.

2. VENUE

Know your venue. Before commencing any shoot, a full recce of the venue is essential, during which any foreseeable problems should be ironed out.

Access for crew and equipment needs to be organised.

Ensure the venue informs their security that you are coming, as crew sitting outside the venue wastes time and costs money.

3. STAGE

The stage is YOUR set! Make it work for you.

TEDx has a style and colour scheme, and you must adhere to these guidelines throughout all media.

4. LIGHTING

It is essential that the stage allows enough room to position a back-light. This will separate your talent from the background, making them stand out and presenting them in the best possible light, literally.

Add a colour balanced key-light to the face of the talent to bring them to life. A clean white light produces the best results. While coloured lights can look great to enhance the atmosphere in a pop video or horror film they will make your TEDx speaker look out of place.

5. AUDIO

You will need a PA for the live show plus audio for the film you are recording. Ideally, you will have a mixing desk and a suitable radio microphone for the talent. You should then be able to split the feed coming into the mixing desk and route the clean unaltered audio back into a camera and/or the video mixing desk.

Remember, without decent sound there is no film.

6. CAMERA

For a multi camera shoot we would recommend at least three cameras. It can be done with fewer, but it will limit your options. Ideally you will have four cameras, with one directed at the audience to get reaction shots. You can utilise the camera closest to the stage to swing around and grab audience reactions at appropriate times, while the director has cut to another camera.

Having cameras of the same make and model will help you balance them properly, which is vital to allow you to live stream with the minimum of difficulty.

7. CREW

An experienced crew is essential for achieving professional results. They will know the procedure to follow the director’s instruction over talkback and deliver the best range of shots.

8. AUDIENCE

Understand your audience! Knowing their interests allows you to invite the right audience to the right event with a subject that is inspiring. Remember that those at the event are not your only audience, there are also the internet viewers.

Understanding your audience and getting inspiring messages out there will encourage your event sponsors to continue their support of your TED X talks.

9. GRAPHICS

If you are streaming live it’s important to have your graphics prepared in advance, including name supers for each speaker, TED logos and any other onscreen material you require. Tedx has its specifications here.

10. MIXING DESK AND DIRECTOR

Whether you are streaming a live recording or finishing in post-production, it’s essential to have a mixing desk and the right director. The mixing desk will produce a finished program. If you’re streaming this will be the output that goes to the web.

If you are going to finish the piece in post-production then you can fine tune or adjust any cuts afterwards.

Most mixing desks are able to output feeds from individual cameras to separate recording devices. These iso recordings from individual cameras can be used later in post. You can also record onto the cards in the cameras, however you must make sure you have enough media to record the entire event or have a DIT on site. (In this instance DIT would be the person responsible for downloading media from each camera). You should ideally use external recorders as this will save you a great deal of time.

The team at 1185films have vast experience in multi camera shoots and work with some of the world’s best talent to deliver engaging professional multi camera content. We can facilitate the whole production, part of the production, or even create the entire event for you.